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Thinking Out Loud

Lenten Days BC

by Michael Jinkins | Dec 01, 2014
Lenten Days BCAdvent is Lenten Land. Days before God's rescue. Shadowland.

Waiting.
                  Waiting.
                                   Waiting.
Gone.

We hardly see this Lent anymore. Not with Christmas aisles sprouting like rows of tinseled corn as soon as the Halloween candy disappears. Not with Christmas lights strung before we roast the Thanksgiving turkey.

Yet Advent is another Lent. That's why the minister dons purple and the chancel guild decks out the church in Lent's gaudy glory.

We do so love to rush to a kind of good news that denies the bad. When I was a child, we had only three holy days: Christmas, Easter and Mother's Day. So we skipped like rocks over the Lenten days of Advent - the long, long wait, the centuries-mimicking endurance run of faith, the dark-shuttered-shadowed days of "O Come, O Come, Emmanuel" that culminate finally, at long last in candlelit "O Come All Ye Faithful."

We argue that it is a shame not to get to sing Christmas carols longer. They are so bright, so cheerful, so soaked in childhood's sheltered view of the world (or so we hope). But there is wisdom in singing the dirge-like waiting songs of Advent for a long, long while before that night when we do at last break out "O Little Town of Bethlehem" and place the baby Jesus in his crèche.

Advent prepares us for the life of faith in which we spend much more time waiting for God than basking in epiphanies. Four weeks on the trail to God knows where and twelve days of Christmas before we have to start hiding our babies from Herod. That's about right.

Rush if we must for the sake of Macy's and Target and whatever other markets lure us into their shrines with tinsel and Bing Crosby. I won't play Scrooge to this. It is all such good fun. And if there's not a child in us whose heart leaps at Christmas's approach, then it is a tragedy. But let's withhold a part of ourselves from the mercantile fakeries, and let's also embrace the sacredness of the wait, the long wait, the painfully long wait, that prepares us to wait some more for a deliverance long-promised and worth waiting for.

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