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1. Burnam Hall
2. Frank H. and Fannie W. Caldwell Chapel
3. Carriage House
4. Furlough Home
5. Gardencourt
6. Heuser Hall
7. Louisville Seminary Labyrinth
8. Laws Lodge
9. Ernest Miller White Library
10. Love and Sherrill Halls and Tri-C
11. Memorial Garden
12. Nelson Hall
13. Power Plant
14. President's Home
15. Seminary Hall
16. Schlegel Hall
17. White Hall
18. Albert and Grace Winn Center

1. Burnam Hall
One of two one- and two-bedroom apartments on campus, Burnam Hall is located in the residential portion of the Seminary's campus. For more information regarding apartment lease rates see Housing.
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2. Frank H. and Fannie W. Caldwell Chapel
For a transcript of a panel discussion on the art and architecture of Caldwell Chapel, select the following link:
Art & Soul Presentation - March 9, 2003

Designed by architects Hartstern, Louis and Henry, the chapel was constructed under one major directive given by the 1962 Seminary Building Committee, that it "must be the dominant symbol on the new campus to clearly show that this is a theological seminary dedicated to the worship and service of God." The chapel crowns the campus like a jewel.

Built in the style of "Modern interpretation of Perpendicular Gothic," the chapel's exterior is also graced by a 65-foot campanile with an electronic carillon. Traditional and contemporary symbols of faith are blended together within the chapel. Its beautiful stained glass windows were designed by William Schickel of Loveland, Ohio.

On October 11, 1963, the chapel, along with the Seminary's new campus and eight buildings, was dedicated. Then, in 1964, The Board of Directors of Louisville Seminary named the chapel in honor of Frank H. and Fannie W. Caldwell as "evidence of the Seminary's love and deep appreciation for all that the Caldwells had done for the institution." Dr. Caldwell was Louisville Seminary's fourth president (1936-1964) and Professor Emeritus of Homiletics (1930-1964).

In 1985, the Roger Wood Puckett Organ was constructed for the Frank H. Caldwell Chapel by the Louisville firm, Steiner-Reck, Inc., through the generosity of local businessman Roger Wood Puckett. Designed in the historical tracker fashion, the organ has a mechanical connection between the keyboard and its more than 2000 pipes. The organ has 34 stops. Mr. Puckett's gift remains a lasting contribution to worship through music at Louisville Seminary
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3. Carriage House
The Carriage House is immediately adjacent to the Laws Lodge Retreat and Conference Center and has a new parking lot with ample room for parking overflow. It is the administrative offices for Presbyterian Homes and Services,
502.259.9101.

The property is approximately 5,000 square feet and served as the Carriage House on the 17-acre Gardencourt property.
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4. Furlough Home
In 1965, the Furlough Home Board added the Furlough Home to the housing side of the campus, which consists of four apartments and shared entertainment areas. This home provides housing for missionaries.
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5. Gardencourt
Purchased in 1987 and renovated in 1989 by Louisville Seminary, the historic Gardencourt mansion houses classrooms, faculty offices, and institutional program offices including the The Louisville Institute. On the first floor, beautifully decorated meeting rooms are available for rental by members of the Seminary community as well as the public.

Built in 1906 by George Norton, a well-known industrialist and financier at the time, Gardencourt is an example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. After the Norton family sold the home it was used by other educational institutions, including the University of Louisville, through the 1970s. The Seminary received an Historic Preservation Alliance Award in 1991 in recognition of the renovation.

Lucie Underwood Norton (1859) and Martha A. (Mattie) Norton (1853-1911) were among the wealthy granddaughters of William Norton (1781-1858), a successful regional manufacturer of hand tools, and the daughters of George W. Norton (1814-1889), who made his fortune as a Russellville storekeeper and banker and later as a Louisville banker. (from the 1988 National Register Nomination).

The Marking and Special Events Department is responsible for marketing, scheduling and managing the use of Seminary properties to the outside community for private functions. By coordinating the planning process for rental clients and working with independent caterers, event planners, security, florists, maintenance and equipment rental firms they can ensure the success of each event.
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6. Heuser Hall
Named for Mr. Henry Vogt Heuser, Sr., who died in November 1999, Heuser Hall is one of two one- and two-bedroom apartments on campus, located in the residential portion of the Seminary's campus. For more information regarding apartment lease rates see Housing.
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7. Louisville Seminary Labyrinth
Just inside the main gate of the campus is the Louisville Seminary Labyrinth on the open lawn. the brick-lined pattern is modeled after the Chartres Labyrinth in France, which was built during the Middle Ages. The labyrinth is open to all who wish to experience this form of spiritual practice. Reservations are not required.
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8. The William R. and Ellen Laws Lodge
Short-term accommodations are available at the Laws Lodge Retreat and Conference Center for graduate students, visitors, and attendees at numerous conferences and continuing education events. The facility is also suitable for retreats and group gatherings. With 48 private sleeping rooms, meeting space and close proximity to the Seminary's library and classrooms, the Laws Lodge is an affordable and convenient alternative to using local hotels.

The Lodge is named for The Rev. William R. and Mrs. Ellen D. Laws. Rev. Laws graduated from Louisville Seminary in 1943 and served most of his ministry - 26 years - as the pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Columbus, Indiana.

The Marketing and Special Events Department is also responsible for marketing, scheduling, and managing the use of Seminary properties to the outside community for private functions. By coordinating the planning process for rental clients and working with independent caterers, event planners, security, florists, maintenance and equipment rental firms, they can ensure the success of each event.
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9. Ernest Miller White Library
The collection of the Ernest Miller White Library contains over 135,000 books and periodicals; 7,000 microforms; 5,000 audio-visual resources; and more than 557 current serial subscriptions. The library's on-line computer catalog is shared with the library of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. This shared catalog allows students to see the holdings of both libraries and borrow materials from each. Other important resources available at the LPTS Library are the ATLA Religion Database, Family Studies Database and software for biblical exegesis-Bible Works and the Logos Library System. As members of the Metroversity consortium, LPTS students and faculty have access to the more than 3.5 million volumes, housed at six Louisville area college and university libraries.

Located on the Seminary's main quadrangle, the Library offers a quiet and comfortable environment for study. Private study carrels, group study space, the computer lab, open and private areas in the reference room provide a variety of options for study.

Instruction in using the libraries' resources is regularly scheduled so that students have the opportunity to become familiar with the extensive resources, print and electronic, that are available for theological research and congregational ministry. The library's computer lab offers students access to e-mail, the Internet, a variety of electronic databases, and software that can enhance their studies. Instruction is also offered in the use of these tools.

The Library is named for Mr. Ernest Miller White who served 52 years at Louisville Seminary as Librarian, Professor of Bibliography and Research, Library Director, and after his retirement in 1985, as Archivist and Special Assistant to the President until his death in 1997. In 1963, Mr. White oversaw the transfer of the entire Seminary library collection from the downtown campus to the Alta Vista Road location.
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10. Love and Sherrill Halls and Tri-C
1970 marked the opening of two new residential halls that were built as one building and named Love and Sherrill Halls after Dr. Julian Price Love, Professor of Biblical Theology (1931-1961), and Dr. Lewis Joseph Sherrill, Professor of Religious Education (1924-1949), respectively.

Love and Sherrill Halls contain three bedroom apartments, six in each hall, which totals twelve complete apartment units. They also have a common area between them that totals about twelve hundred square feet, which is called "Tri-C". This space is available to all students and employees for informal gatherings.

An outdoor common area behind Love and Sherrill Halls is equipped with a children's playground, picnic tables and space for outdoor grilling. An extended lawn flows past Seminary Hall, toward White Hall and the community garden plots.
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11. The Memorial Garden in Honor of Lela N. Rhodes
In 1996, a Memorial Garden was established behind the Frank H. and Fannie W. Caldwell Chapel in honor of Mrs. Lela Nelson Rhodes, beloved Bookstore manager (1967-1982) and spouse of the late Professor of Old Testament Arnold Black Rhodes. This area is beautifully landscaped and handicap accessible. The space includes teak benches, attractive landscaping, and an iron grid along an ivy-covered wall for bronze plaques that are mounted to acknowledge the person whose remains are interred there.
In April 2008, the Seminary dedicated a cross sculpture, which now marks the Memorial Garden' serene location. The Celtic-style cross was created from one continuous piece of metal by C.D. Weaver of Austin, Texas, who shares, “The design of this cross reflects the fact that the love and goodness of God have no beginning and no end.”
Employees, alums, and friends connected to Louisville Seminary can make arrangements through the Seminary Relations Office to purchase plots for future use. If you have interest in the Memorial Garden, contact the Office of Institutional Advancement, 800.264.1839 or 502.895.3411.
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12. Nelson Hall
Nelson Hall houses campus administration offices and classrooms. This building is a two-story, approximately 24,000 square foot building. In addition to three classrooms, departments located in Nelson Hall include, on the upper level, Admissions, Registrar, Dean's Office, Student Services, the President's Office, the Seminary switchboard and fax machine. In the lower level one will find the campus Mail Center and mail boxes, Printshop, Business Office, the Offices for Communications, Alum & Church Relations, the Annual Fund, the Seminary's database, and the Office for Seminary Relations.

Located in the lower level of the south wing of Nelson Hall is the Marriage and Family Therapy Program, along with the Louisville Seminary Counseling Training Center, which offers training for interns in the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy degree Program. It also offers counseling services to churches, agencies and the community for affordable fees. The interns are supervised by a team of qualified faculty and practitioners from the community. The interns earn credit toward membership with the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (AAMFT) through their counseling hours. The Counseling Ministry can be reached by calling 502-894-2293.

Nelson Hall is named for the Seminary's sixth president, Dr. C. Ellis and Mrs. Nancy Gribble Nelson. Dr. Nelson is President Emeritus (1974-1981) and Professor Emeritus of Christian Education.
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13. PowerPlant
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14. President's Home
Louisville Seminary was established on the Alta Vista campus in 1963, moving from the downtown campus on Broadway. The Alta Vista campus originally started with approximately 60 acres in the beautiful setting of Cherokee Park.

Originally, nine buildings were built simultaneously, four for housing, four for academic use, and one power plant. All buildings were completed and opened in 1963, which also included an existing residential house, on Alta Vista Road, which was and still is used as the president's home.

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15. Seminary Hall
A one and one-half-story student residence building comprised of 24 studio apartments, Seminary Hall is built into the east edge of the campus where the property slopes toward Alta Vista Road. Each studio includes a fully equipped kitchenette, separate bathroom, spacious closet, large picture window, individual heat and air, and is wired for Internet access. Four slightly larger units have been fitted for ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) compliancy. Walkways connect the building to other housing units and a continuous driving loop will provide new access to the east side of the campus. For more information regarding apartment lease rates, see Housing.

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16. Schlegel Hall
Schlegel Hall is named for Mr. Leland Daniel Schlegel and Honorary Life Member of the Board of Trustees for his service from 1954-1978. This former student dormitory is being renovated into classrooms, faculty offices, program administration offices, and a student center, and will be ready for occupancy January 2008. The classroom additions are outfitted with wireless computer access for teaching. A series of small (10-15 people) break out rooms provide space for more intimate meetings. While there are certainly many wonderful spaces for students all over the campus' lush, park-like setting, Schlegel Hall now offers an exclusive area where students can gather informally for discussions between classes or to enjoy a cup of coffee and watch TV or access the Internet. Faculty offices are located on the second and third floors, where one will also find the Office for Field Education & Ministry Placement, the Academic Support Center, and Lifelong Learning and Advanced Degrees.

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17. White Hall
White Hall, named for Mary Wilson White of Tennessee; alum Newton H. White III (BD, '52); Trustee Mallie White Regen (19'61-1970); Courtnay White Bixler, is divided between several furnished efficiency apartments and the facilities of the Women's Center, which provides information and education as a necessary part of the formation of networks of solidarity across race, class, and gender, networks that are crucial for bringing about change in current structures of injustice and inequality. Through informal gatherings, special events, a centralized location for resources.

For more information regarding apartment lease rates, see Housing.

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18. Albert and Grace Winn Center
The heart of activity on campus is the Winn Center, named in honor of Grace W. and Dr. Albert C. Winn, the Seminary's fifth president from 1966 to 1973 and Professor of Doctrinal Theology from 1960 to 1973. The building, constructed in 1963, was renovated in 1999 including a new roof to match the new roof lines of other campus buildings surrounding the academic quadrangle. Recognizing the importance of the Winn Center as the campus "gathering space," renovations were made possible by numerous private donations and gifts from Seminary alums who committed to raise $750,000 towards the $1.8 million total renovation cost.

The Winn Center houses the campus main dining room, a covered patio, meeting space, a comfortable lounge, and the Seminary Bookstore. The Facilities Department is located on the west side of the building.

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  • Louisville, KY 40205 |
  • 800.264.1839 |
  • Fax: 502.895.1096 |
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